Vaccine Schedule For Baby: Infant Vaccination Schedule

If you have a little one, you will want to do everything in your power to protect it from danger and the innumerable childhood illnesses. It is important to discuss infant vaccines with your pediatrician, because scheduling ahead of time will save you a lot of time and grief.

Infant Vaccination Schedule

Vaccines will make your child immune from contagious diseases. Many parents will opt out on vaccines, because of the rumors that surround them. If you are interested in the link of autism to child vaccines, please read this article.

The only other way that your child can become immune to these childhood diseases, they must actually get the disease. This is very risky, because some of these diseases are very serious and can be life threatening.

FDA continues to regulate these vaccines to ensure your child’s safety. All of the vaccines that are administered in the United States are very safe and effective in the prevention of childhood diseases (CDC).

  • HepB – is administered in 3 doses. The first dose should be administered at the hospital, prior to discharge and followed up by the second dose, which should be administered between the ages of 1-2 months. The third and last dose should be administered between the ages of 6-18 months. The injected is normally administered in the vastus lateralis (lateral or outer thigh muscle).
  • DTap (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis) – is administered in 5 doses. The first dose should be administered at 2, 4, 6, and between 15-18 months, followed by the last dose, which should be administered between 4-6 years of age. This vaccine is administered in the vastus lateralis (infants), gluteus medius (summit of the iliac crest) or the deltoid muscle (older children).
  • Hib (haemophilus influenza type B) – is administered in 4 doses. The first dose should be administered at 2 months of aged followed by a dose at 4, 6, and between 12-15 months of age. This vaccine is administered in the vastus lateralis, gluteus medius, or deltoid muscle.
  • PCV (pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine) – is administered in 4 doses. The first dose should be administered at 2 months of aged, followed by a dose at 4, 6, and between 12-15 months of age. This vaccine is administered in the vastus lateralis, gluteus medius, or deltoid muscle.
  • IPV (polio) –  is administered in 4 doses. The first dose should be administered at 2 months of age, followed by a dose at 4 months and between the ages of 6-18 months. The booster is administered between the ages of 4-6 years. This vaccine is administered orally.
  • Seasonal Influenza – is administered annually. This vaccine is administered in the deltoid, vastus lateralis, or the gluteus medius.
  • MMR (mumps, measles, rubella) – is administered in 2 doses. The first dose should be administered between the ages of 12-15 months, followed by a booster between 4-6 years of age. This vaccine is administered in the vastus lateralis, gluteus medius, or the deltoid muscle.
  • Varicella (chickenpox) – is administered in 2 doses. The first dose should be administered between 12-15 months of age, followed by the second dose, which should be administered between 4-6 years of age. This vaccine is administered intradermal in the inner portion of the forearm.
  • HepA – is administered in 2 doses. The first dose should be administered between 12-23 months, but 6 months apart. This vaccine is administered in the vastus lateralis, gluteus medius, or the deltoid muscle.

Vaccine Schedule For Baby

There are some side effects that may be exhibited with these vaccines including:

  • Decreased appetite
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Tenderness, redness, and edema at injection site
  • Low-grade fever – younger than 3 months of age (100.3 F or lower), 3-24 months (101.9 F or lower)
  • Irritability
  • Drowsiness

You can apply a cool wash cloth on the injection site to help alleviate the pain, redness, and edema. Aspirin-free analgesic can be administered, but check with your pediatrician beforehand.

Immunization Schedule For Infants

While there are risks of severe allergic reactions in some children, the occurrences are extremely rare (1 out of every million doses CDC). Severe signs to monitor for include:

  • Convulsions (1 in every 14,000 children)
  • Inconsolable crying for over 3 hours (1 in every 1,000 children)
  • Permanent brain damage
  • Lethargy
  • Temperature over 105 degrees F (1 in every 16,000 children)

Baby Vaccine Schedule

Signs of anaphylaxis (severe allergic reaction):

  • Bradycardia (low pulse) or tachycardia (rapid pulse)
  • Nausea/vomiting/diarrhea
  • Vertigo (dizziness)
  • Syncope (fainting)
  • Airway constriction and dyspnea (difficulty breathing)
  • Generalized hives and itchy skin
  • Blanching of the skin (reddened areas intermixed with whitish areas)

If you detect any of the conditions, be sure to call 911 immediately. Vaccines for babies is a necessity, especially, if you are looking for immunity against childhood illnesses.

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